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Thu, Mar 1, 2018 6:50 AM

Base Station no longer 'SmashSafe'? (removed from website)

I noticed the 'SmashSafe' description changed on your website this month.

http://web.archive.org/web/20180210023121/http://simplisafe.com/
'An intruder can damage the keypad or Base Station. Doesn't matter.'

http://simplisafe.com today:
'An intruder can damage the keypad. Doesn't matter.'

Why did this change? Is the Base Station no longer considered 'SmashSafe'?

84 Messages

5年前

>And most dimwitted intruders won't even notice or know what to do anyways.

Oh I agree, and as I said I'm mostly happy with the system. Here I'm just disappointed because a feature was falsely advertised. Plus, the fact that most criminals are idiots will not help you if you end up getting victimized by a smart one.

You also have to recognize, by default, no sensors are set to instant trigger. I'd bet a majority of simplisafe owners never change this. They probably also don't change the default 30 second entry delay for *home* mode. Those same people probably leave the base station sitting on a table, in the open, like the TV ads show. If the smashsafe feature was as advertised that wouldn't really be an issue, but it is with the way the system is designed.

Advocate

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2.8K Messages

5年前

^ Thanks, Alex, for all you've done and for confirming what we've seen to be true.  Setting sensors to instant trigger is the ideal setup. (and hiding the base station, obviously).

In your situation, at least turn the base station light off if you can, test it inside a decorative box/decor-something, etc, I know you'll be able to get creative :)

84 Messages

@coltmaster1 Yeah, I'll probably hide it. Only problem is that I'd also like to see if the system is armed before leaving. The keypad doesn't show anything until you touch it, unlike the old keypad which would always show the alarm status as long as you had relatively good light.

But that's a minor gripe, the rest of the system/keypad is a huge upgrade and I like it.

257 Messages

5年前

Wow just checked this topic on forum. I believe the main fact is why did SS pull from their ad of  the SS3 system "SmashSafe" that included both the keypad and base station. Changing it to just "SmashSafe" feature to the keypad only in their ad about a week to 10 days after roll out. And why no response from SS on this topic. They respond to other topics.

Advocate

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2.8K Messages

5年前

Ha, cut a hole in a box or some decorative object, turn the object in the opposite direction of immediate view so that only you know where to view the light (sort of how people set up hidden cameras, except you still need your base station to be able to receive signals from all your sensors without obstruction).

1 Message

4年前

I contacted SimpliSafe TWO YEARS ago about this issue.  They advised me that the system has a "dialer delay" (I believe it was 30 seconds, but I cannot remember the precise delay) which means that the system does not SEND any signals until 30 seconds AFTER the siren starts blaring.  Since the siren is in the base, that means that a bad guy has 30 seconds (or whatever the dialer delay is) AFTER the siren sounds to locate the base and destroy it.

The term "dialer delay" is an industry term that was initially used with alarm systems that picked up the phone line and made a phone call to report to the central station, but it continues to be used for alarms that use cellular data.  The dialer delay is ostensibly to reduce false alarms, but it is really a protocol that independent monitoring centers demanded so as to reduce their workload.  With dialer delay implemented, they never have to deal with an alarm until 30 seconds after it has gone off.

The dialer delay was implemented in the context of the industry as it existed when the dialer delay concept was implemented, which I believe was back in the 1990s.  Typically, your local alarm installer would install the system and then subcontract the monitoring to a local or regional monitoring company.  That company, wishing to reduce its overhead, insisted upon the dialer delay so that it would not have to deal with false alarms at all unless they lasted longer than 30 seconds.

While the dialer delay system does reduce false alarms and save labor at the monitoring center, it creates an obvious security hole in that an intruder can just locate the panel and destroy it during the dialer delay.  Once alarm system customers became aware of the security issue (because they got no calls at all when they shut off the alarm quickly), some alarm companies started advertising "smash and crash" (or similar verbiage) protection.

Crash and smash protection **still** implements the dialer delay before reporting an alarm, but will send an immediate "alarm pending" signal as soon as the siren sounds (or even as soon as the entry delay begins) and then will treat that as an alarm activation if they don't get a disarm signal within a certain period of time.

The whole thing is just stupid from the get go.  As discussed by others, what they should have done in the first place is to have the signal sent immediately and then have a computer system that ignored the signal if a cancel signal came in a certain amount of time.  However, when the dialer delay system was implemented, computer systems in alarm monitoring centers were ancient and didn't have the programming to hold an alarm.  It was easier to force the insecure dialer delay system on customers.  That protocol was actually adopted as part of UL security protocols and so even modern alarm systems still have to have a dialer delay in order to meet UL standards.

1 Message

4年前

New to Simplisafe and this forum.  Familar with the pending alrm signal of Guardian and the need for the monitoring center to receive a subsequent alarm cancel signal or they go into action.

But perhaps the description of the Smashsafe protection on the Simplisafe Site,  "An intruder can damage the keypad. Doesn't matter." clafifies that the Base station is needed to sound the alarm siren.  After all, the system may be used without monitoring.  Without the Base, no audible alrms will be generated.

Community Admin

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3.2K Messages

4年前

@shop_18

I apologize if any information was miscommunicated. When an alarm is triggered on your system, the signal is sent to the Monitoring Service immediately. You can see that if you check your TImeline online - a duplicate of each logged message is what your system sends over to Monitoring.

You may be talking about the grace period, which is that  - while the call sequence is in motion - if the Monitoring Service receives a second signal for a disarm, the will assume that it was a false alarm (because you were there to disarm the system right away) and the operator will not initiate a call.

We do work with C.O.P.S. Monitoring, the best monitoring company in the industry. They are able to cover all customers nationwide.

(edited)

2 Messages

and then 4 years of silence from SimpliSafe after @general_kaos asked you to clarify your vague words. Smh

2 Messages

Also you signed "Johnny M" but your official signature icon says "Davey D."

Great way to build trust in the company. 

Jfc

Community Admin

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3.2K Messages

@davey_d yes, that was from four years ago. It's likely that my team had already answered in a different thread.

Currently, the alarm signal is sent when there is an actual alarm - i.e. at the same time as when the sirens are sounding.

It is possible to disrupt the signal if the Base Station is totally disabled during the countdown. So it is vital to place the Base Station out of reach of potential intruders to give it time to trigger an alarm.

Alternately, individual Entry Sensors can also be set to "Instant Trigger", so it skips the countdown entirely and triggers the sirens immediately. We recommend this for points of entry that don't need the countdown, like windows, or infrequently used doors.

708 Messages

4年前

@Johnny - sorry, parsing words, please define "alarm is triggered."  You are not limited to the following choices: (1) when the countdown timer starts, (2) when the alarm initially sounds, (3) other - please specify.

Based on another user's post several months ago, I am guessing #2.  If I remember correctly, the user caused an alarm "situation" while the base station was on battery power and immediately thereafter pulled a battery.  No call from COPS.